Faculty of Education, Social Sciences and Law

School of Law

Australia's proposal for citizenship stripping

03 November 2015 | 13:15 - 14:00 | Seminar
Room G.33, Liberty Building

Professor George Williams, Faculty of Law, UNSW, Sydney, Australia

This public seminar, by one of Australia’s leading constitutional lawyers and public commentators, will ask just how far democratic states might go in reshaping the membership of the community to respond to the threat of terrorism.

A bill has been introduced into the Australian Parliament enabling dual nationals to be stripped of their citizenship. This would occur automatically in a range of circumstances, including where a person has engaged in terrorism, advocated terrorism, engaged in hostile activity overseas or been convicted of a listed crime, including damaging federal property, even where the crime has no connection to terrorism. The Bill has been justified on the basis that it is part of an international movement by democratic states to expel dangerous dual nationals and to prevent foreign fighters from returning home. Even compared to contentious models in other nations, such as the United Kingdom, the Australian proposal is exceptional and extreme. This talk will examine the Australian bill and ask just how far democratic states might go in reshaping the membership of the community to respond to the threat of terrorism.

About the Speaker

George Williams is one of Australia’s leading constitutional lawyers and public commentators. He is the Anthony Mason Professor, a Scientia Professor and the Foundation Director of the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law at the Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales. As an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow, he is engaged in a multi-year year international project on anti-terror laws and democracy. George has written and edited many books, has appeared as a barrister in the High Court, and has served on a number of public inquiries. George was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2011: ‘For distinguished service to the law in the fields of anti-terrorism, human rights and constitutional law as an academic, author, adviser and public commentator.’

Location Details

Room G.33,
School of Law,
Liberty Building,
University of Leeds
LS2 9JT

The Liberty Building is number 16 on the campus map.

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