Faculty of Education, Social Sciences and Law

School of Law

13 October 2014 | Sarah Redhead

Dr Henry Yeomans (Law) discusses the new drug nalmefene and how it raises the issue of what people consider as ‘good’ drinking and ‘bad’ drinking.

Dr Henry Yeomans (Law) discusses the new drug nalmefene and how it raises the issue of what people consider as ‘good’ drinking and ‘bad’ drinking.

Dr Yeomans, whose research interests centre around behavioural regulation and historical criminology, raises the topic in The Conversation. He says:

"The use of nalmefene to reduce alcohol consumption was recently endorsed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Nalmefene is an opiate that is used to incrementally reduce cravings for alcohol. NICE recommends it is used, alongside psychosocial treatments such as counselling, to treat people regarded as dependent on alcohol.

This raises a number of interesting issues, not only the usual ones about cost and effectiveness, but also how conclusions are drawn between what constitutes “good” and “bad” drinking."

Read the article here.

Or, find out more about Dr Henry Yeomans.

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