School of Law

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Dr Julie Wallbank's Publications

Books

  • Wallbank JA, Vulnerabilities, Care and Family Law, First (London: Routledge, 2013)

    Author URL [www.routledge.com]

  • Wallbank JA, Choudhry S, Herring J, Rights, Gender and Family Law, ed. by Wallbank JA, Choudhry S and Herring J (Routledge Cavendish, 2010), 1-292

    This collection, however, argues that rights cannot be given centre-stage withoutthinking through the ramifications for gendered power-relations, and the ...

  • Wallbank JA, Challenging Motherhood(s) (Prentice-Hall, 2001), 200p.

Journal articles

  • Wallbank JA, Mant JL, ‘The mysterious case of disappearing family law and the shrinking vulnerable subject: The shifting sands of family law’s jurisdiction’, Social and Legal Studies, 26.5 (2017), 629-648
    DOI: 10.1177/0964663917691594, Repository URL: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/111836/

    This article seeks to critically examine the implications that the new eligibility requirements for legal aid as implemented by the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 are having on the ways in which private family law governs families. It makes use of a theoretical lens drawn from the work of Valverde (2009, 2014a, 2014b) on ‘jurisdiction’ to map the shift that has taken place within family law as a result of the political boundary that the act has drawn between ‘vulnerable’ litigants eligible for legal aid and the rest of families engaging with private family law, for whom self-sufficiency and responsibility is encouraged and expected. It argues that in reserving legal aid for a narrow group of vulnerable litigants, the formal scale of family law has shrunk, there being at the same time an increased reliance on more informal sources of law such as advice-based resources. This has led to a diversification of formal and informal scales of governance which operate according to different ‘logics’, which impact negatively on access to family justice for families from various backgrounds and circumstances. The article concludes with a call for family law researchers to be mindful of the need to look at both formal and more informal sources of family law in order to fully appreciate developments within the jurisdiction, particularly pernicious ones, and to be able to respond to them appropriately.

  • Wallbank JA, Dietz C, ‘Lesbian mothers, fathers and other animals: Is the political personal in multiple parent families?’, Child and Family Law Quarterly, 4 (2013)

  • Cave E, Wallbank JA, ‘Minors’ Capacity to Refuse Treatment: A Reply to Gilmore and Herring’, Medical Law Review 2012, 1-27

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Channelling the messiness of diverse family lives: resisting the calls to order and de-centring the hetero-normative family’, Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 32.4 (2010), 353-368

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Bodies in the Shadows': joint birth registration, parental responsibility and social class’, Child and Family Law Quarterly, 21.3 (2009), 267-282

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Getting Tough on Mothers: Regulating Contact and Residence’, Feminist Legal Studies, 15.2 (2007), 189-222
    DOI: 10.1007/s10691-007-9056-z

  • Wallbank JA, ‘The role of rights and utility in instituting a child’s right to know her genetic history’, Social & Legal Studies, 13.2 (2004), 245-264
    DOI: 10.1177/0964663904042553

  • Bryan I, Wallbank JA, ‘The lore of sexual difference in social and legal discourse on 'date rape’, Law and Critique, 15.2 (2004), 183-206
    DOI: 10.1023/B:LACQ.0000035033.82571.4a

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Reconstructing the HFEA 1990: Is blood really thicker than water?’, Child and Family Law Quarterly, 16.4 (2004), 387-397

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Regulating reproduction: A century of conflict in Britain and France’, SOC LEGAL STUD, 12.4 (2003), 555-556

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Too Many Mothers? Surrogacy, Kinship and the welfare of the child’, Medical Law Review, 10.3 (2002), pp.271--294
    DOI: 10.1093/medlaw/10.3.271

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Clause 106 of the Adoption and Children Bill: legislation for the 'good' father?’, Legal Studies, 22.2 (2002), 276-296
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1748-121X.2002.tb00193.x

Chapters

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Universal norms, individualisation and the need for recognition: the failure(s) of the self-managed post-separation family’, in Vulnerabilities, Care and Family Law, ed. by Wallbank JA, First (London: Routledge, 2013)

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Vulnerabilities, Care and Family Law’, in Vulnerabilities, Care and Family Law, ed. by Wallbank JA, First (London: Routledge, 2013)

  • Wallbank JA, Choudhry S, Herring J, ‘Welfare, rights, care and gender in family law’, in Rights, Gender and Family Law, ed. by Wallbank J, Choudhry S and Herring J (Routledge Cavendish, 2010)

    This collection, however, argues that rights cannot be given centre-stage withoutthinking through the ramifications for gendered power-relations, and the ...

  • Wallbank JA, ‘Responsible parents and parental responsibility’, in Responsible parents and parental responsibility, ed. by Probert R, Gilmore S and Herring J (Hart Pub, 2009)

    This book examines the idea of 'parental responsibility' in English law and whatis expected of a responsible parent.

  • Wallbank JA, ‘(En)Gendering the fusion of rights and responsibilities in the law of contact’, in Rights, Gender and Family Law, ed. by Wallbank JA, Choudhry S and Herring J ([n.pub.], [n.d.])

  • Dietz C, Wallbank JA, ‘Square peg, round hole?’: The Legal regulation of Plus Two Parent Families’, in From Civil Partnerships to Same-Sex Marriage: Interdisciplinary Reflections, ed. by Barker N and Monk D (London: Routledge, [n.d.]), 167-182

    For many years donor insemination has been used by lesbians in order to create their own families. In the UK, choices will be made on whether or not to use known heterosexual or gay donors and what level of input, if any, the donor/father will have. Though the terminology is loaded, this chapter will engage with debates about the role of the gay father in lesbian families when relationships break down, particularly where there is evidence that he was intended pre-conception to play some sort of role in the child’s life, and has assumed actual responsibilities post-birth. It will reflect upon the assimilationist strategies of the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008 (hereafter the 2008 Act), which positions different lesbian families on a hetero-normative continuum of acceptability. Questions will also be raised about how courts to date have approached what might be called ‘Plus Two Parent’ (PTP) families and in particular how gay fathers find themselves positioned therein.

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