Faculty of Education, Social Sciences and Law

School of Law

LLB Law (graduate programme)

In this Section:

If you want to ...

  • convert to law from a first degree in another discipline
  • graduate with a qualifying law degree
  • cover the seven foundations of legal knowledge
  • pursue a programme that consolidates a three year law degree into two years

... then choose LLB law (graduate programme).


LLB Law (graduate programme) provides you with the opportunity to learn about the law, both in the traditional sense of 'thinking like a lawyer' and in the broader sense of law as a social institution.

Our LLB Law (graduate programme) is a 'Qualifying Law Degree'. This status means that graduation from the programme exempts you from the Common Professional Examination: the initial stage of professional qualification as a solicitor or barrister for both the Law Society of England and Wales, and the Bar Council. This shortens your professional training, should you wish to practise in England and Wales, by one year.

This programme is for people who already hold a first degree. The pace of the course takes this previous academic experience into consideration.

Develop your interests

We offer a wide range of study options throughout the LLB programme, allowing you to develop your interests in the specialist legal areas of your choice.

If you are interested in commercial and corporate law, you can take courses in Company Law and Employment Law. However, if your interests lie in the field of criminal justice, you can study Criminology, or Policing. Other options of more general interest include Environmental Law, Evidence and Family Law.

Year One

There are four compulsory modules in Year One. These are designed to introduce you to the basic principles of private and public law and provide you with the academic tools for successful study.

  • Constitutional Law
  • Contract Law
  • Criminal Law
  • Foundations of Law

Year Two

There are four compulsory modules in Year Two.

  • EU Law
  • Land Law
  • Equity and Trusts
  • Torts

You choose a number of modules from this indicative list.

  • Company Law
  • French Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • International Law
  • Employment Law
  • Family Law
  • Victims, Crime and Restorative Justice
  • Cybercrime: Computers and Crime in the Information Age
  • Youth Crime and Justice
  • War Crimes and Genocide
  • Banking and Financial Services Law
  • Discrimination Law
  • Criminal Law
  • Evidence
  • Medical Malpractice
  • Moral Dilemmas in Medical Law
  • Medical Law
  • Law and the Environment I: Pollution Control
  • Law and the Environment II: Development and Nature Conservation
  • Comparative European Legal Systems
  • Policing
  • Terrorism and the Law
  • Human Rights and Media Wrongs
  • Dissertation
  • Equity and Trusts
  • Land Law
  • Long Dissertation
  • Commercial Law
  • Insurance and Risk Management
  • Jurisprudence

LLB Law (graduate programme) learning and assessment

The study of law involves much more than learning legal principles and rules.

A central aim of LLB Law is to develop the traditional skill of 'thinking like a lawyer'. However, we recognise that to understand, use and apply the law involves the development of many transferable intellectual skills.

We promote expertise in analysis, synthesis, logical argument, research techniques and methodology, organisation of information, and oral and written presentation of materials throughout the degree programme.

A broader contextual approach, where we examine the law as a social institution and in its relationship with the real world, also complements our legal programme.

LLB Law (graduate programme) is demanding: you need to be both enthusiastic and dedicated to your studies. You will do much of your preparatory work independently, and there is a large amount of reading and information to assimilate.

While we provide learning support through an induction week for new students and subject tutors offers structured guidance about study skills, LLB Law is geared towards the self-motivated and independent learner. You will also carry out a substantial piece of independent research in your final year.

The Law Library within the Brotherton Library is integral to the working life of both students and staff in the School of Law with over fifty thousand volumes, and extensive holdings covering Commonwealth, American and European Law as well as English law.

The library offers further support through electronic access to legal materials through networked databases, journals and the internet; the library has plenty of workspace and includes large computer clusters.

Teaching methods

Students learn through traditional methods such as lectures, tutorials and seminars. This face-to-face learning is supported through materials and exercises available on our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Students acquire a plethora of skills during their learning, such as communication skills, problem-solving, independent thinking and research skills.

The Foundations of Law module in Year One is an intensive, front loaded module designed to prepare students for the demands of studying law at undergraduate level, and includes substantive content as well as practical skills such as group work and mooting.

Assessment

The School assesses some modules by a range of different methods including seen and unseen examinations, coursework, group work and oral participation. These are designed to test student competency in a range of different ways, ultimately producing a graduate with a demonstrable range of key skills.

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